Describing Motion With Words - Intro

Vector Direction

This web page is designed to provide some additional practice with the use of scaled vector diagrams for the representation of the magnitude and direction of a vector. Many of the problems should resemble the questions on a Unit 3 packet handout titled "Vector Representation." Additional problems have been added to provide further practice. Your time will be best spent if you read each practice problem carefully, attempt to solve the problem, and then check your answer. You are cautioned to avoid making a quick reference to the solution prior to making your own attempt at the solution. Such a habit is likely to fail at nurturing the ability to draw a scaled vector diagram. If the solution to these practice problems are still not meaningful, you are encouraged to obtain some on-line help in The Physics Classroom - visit the page on vector direction.


Determine the magnitude and direction of the following vectors in questions #1-6. Use the counter-clockwise (from East) convention discussed in class to determine the direction. Use the indicated scale and a scale conversion to determine the magnitude. Depress mouse on the "pop-up menu" to check the answers.

1. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m/s, determine the magnitude and direction of this vector.



 

2. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 50 km/hr, determine the magnitude and direction of this vector.



 

3. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m/s, determine the magnitude and direction of this vector.


 

4. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 50 km/hr, determine the magnitude and direction of this vector.



 

5. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m/s, determine the magnitude and direction of this vector.


 

 

6. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 50 km/hr, determine the magnitude and direction of this vector.



 

 


Use an accurately-drawn scaled vector diagram to represent the magnitude and direction of the following vectors in questions #7-12. Use the indicated scale and the counter-clockwise convention discussed in class. Click on the hot link to check the answers.

7. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m, represent the vector 50 m, 30-degrees by a scaled vector diagram.

See Answer and Solution

 

8. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m, represent the vector 60 m, 150-degrees by a scaled vector diagram.

See Answer and Solution

 

9. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 20 m, represent the vector 140 m/s, 200-degrees by a scaled vector diagram.

See Answer and Solution

 

10. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 15 m/s, represent the vector 120 m/s, 240-degrees by a scaled vector diagram.

See Answer and Solution

 

11. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 5 m/s, represent the vector 35 m/s, 270-degrees by a scaled vector diagram.

See Answer and Solution

 

12. Given the SCALE: 1 cm = 5 m/s, represent the vector 31 m/s, 310-degrees by a scaled vector diagram.

See Answer and Solution

 



Answers and Solutions

NOTE: Since your answers were determined using a scaled vector diagram, small errors in the measurement of the direction and magnitude of any one of the vectors may lead to small differences between your answers and the correct ones which are shown here. Do not have a cow.

 

7. The vector 50 m, 30-degrees (SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m) would look like this:

Return to Questions
Get on-line help at The Physics Classroom

 

 

 

8. The vector 60 m, 150-degrees (SCALE: 1 cm = 10 m) would look like this:

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Get on-line help at The Physics Classroom

 

 

9. The vector 140 m, 200-degrees (SCALE: 1 cm = 20 m)would look like this:

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Get on-line help at The Physics Classroom

 

10. The vector 120 m/s, 240-degrees (SCALE: 1 cm = 15 m/s) would look like this:

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Get on-line help at The Physics Classroom

 

 

 

11. The vector 35 m/s, 270-degrees (SCALE: 1 cm = 5 m/s) would look like this:

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Get on-line help at The Physics Classroom

 

 

12. The vector 31 m/s, 310-degrees (SCALE: 1 cm = 5 m/s) would look like this:

Return to Questions
Get on-line help at The Physics Classroom

 

 


 
To GBS Physics Home Page

This page created by Tom Henderson of Glenbrook South High School.

A special thanks to lab assistants Ryan Tagtmeier and Bryce Mautner

for assistance with creation of the graphics and the HTML mark-up.

Comments and suggestions can be sent by e-mail to Tom Henderson.

This page last updated on 6/30/97.