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Refraction and Lenses

Use the links below to access specific internet content for Refraction and Lenses. The internet content is available at the GBS Physics web site as well as from other external sites. (Please notify the instructor of any broken links. Thanks!)

  • A detailed discussion of the phenomenon of refraction, including: refraction as a boundary behavior, refraction and the distortion of images, the cause of refraction, optical density and light speed, and two general rules about the direction of bending. Start in Lesson 1a of the Physics Classroom.
  • Remember the archer fish? Read about its secret and how smart fishes who live and do well in schools have a bright future and can make a great living from under the water.
  • So you have learned SFA and FST and you know how to draw a refracted ray for any combination of medium when relative speed values, relative n values or relative optical densities. But now you ask: how much does the light ray bend towards or away from the normal? How do you know exactly where the light ray is at? Find out the answers to these important questions in Lesson 2 of the Physics Classroom. Learn about the angle of refraction, the use of Snell's law to solve problems and trace a light ray through a layer of material, and the use of Snell's Law to determine the index of refraction of an unknown material.
  • Learn about concave and convex lenses in Lesson 5 of the Physics Classroom. Topics include the anatomy of a lens, rules of refraction for lenses, and image formation by lenses.
  • A convex, converging lens will produce various images depending upon the location of the object. Learn about these object-image relationships and how ray diagrams can be used to predict the location, type, orientation, and relative size of an image. See Lesson 5 of the Physics Classroom.
  • A concave, diverging lens will produce various images depending upon the location of the object. Learn about these object-image relationships and how ray diagrams can be used to predict the location, type, orientation, and relative size of an image. See Lesson 5 of the Physics Classroom.
  • Like the mirror equation, the lens equation can be used to predict the precise location and size of the image formed by a lens. Learn how such predictions can be made in Lesson 5 of the Physics Classroom.
  • The eye is an amazing work of human anatomy capable of focusing an image on your retina and sending interpretable information to your brain. Learn about its marvels, including its anatomical features, the means of image detection, and the wonder of accommodation. Then find out about the evil eye as you explore the problems of farsightedness and nearsightedness. Start in Lesson of the Physics Classroom.
  • View the Broken Pencil animation (which corresponds to the in-class lab) to learn more about how and why the refraction of light results in the distortion of images.
  • Finally, there is a unit review at the Review Session and some sample quizzes at the Quiz Room.

 

 

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E-mail: Tom Henderson || Last update: 8/26/2005